Game Changers – Women in Agriculture: The multimedia exhibition is online!

20 December 2020

Women in rural areas bring about great changes every day despite many obstacles. As part of the special initiative ONE WORLD – No Hunger, seven women from Africa and Asia were awarded for their commitment to agriculture. A digital exhibition shows their impressive success stories.

How it all began
The competition “Game Changers – Women in Agriculture” started in spring 2020 and was launched by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) as part of the special initiative ONE WORLD – No Hunger, which was initiated in 2014. A multimedia exhibition is now online.

Seven inspiring Women
As gardeners, entrepreneurs, founders and presidents of farmers’ organizations, the seven Game Changers have implemented and spread innovative agricultural approaches in their villages and countries –either directly in the field or in other areas of local value chains such as processing and marketing of rice, tomatoes or cashew nuts. With their work and their activities, the seven award winners from India, Togo, Benin, Ghana and South Sudan motivate other people in their country’s rural areas to work together for and stand up for better conditions in agriculture and for the often-disregarded rights of women to land.

A visual and colorful exhibition
The road to success was not easy, and time and again the women had to defy resistance from within their communities. How the seven women managed to succeed is currently shown in a multimedia exhibition, which picks up their stories and tells them in several video and audio installations. The Pakistani artist Sana Nasir illustrated the colorful exhibition and managed to highlight very personal characteristics of the individual Game Changers.

Find more info and visit the exhibition here:
Game Changers – 2030 | ONEWORLD No Hunger (weltohnehunger.org)

Information on the sector project “Sustainable Rural Areas”:
Sustainable Rural Development sector project (giz.de)

Contact: Dorothea Hohengarten, dorothea.hohengarten@giz.de